5 Questions with Toby Blome and Contessa Treffone

Toby Blome

Contessa Treffone: Toby Blome, like the chemist, can you describe There Will Be A Climax, with a verb, an adjective and a noun?
Toby Blome: Spin. Round. Baby.

Which do you think came first, the deadly sin or the sloth?
Obviously ‘sloth’ is just fake news created by a bunch of men hundreds of years after the real deadly sins died. Just a political ploy. I don’t believe in any of it. Fake news.

What makes you climax, Toby?
Remembering that statistically at least once every day someone somewhere in the world discovers how hard Mondays can be!

As your idol, what would you say inspires you most about me?
Haha where to begin! How about how you constantly belittle me and everyone else in the cast and that time you swore that I’d never amount to anything and that everyone who loved me was just too guilty to leave.

Toby, you are a tall man. Chicken or beef?
Chicken.

Contessa Treffone

Toby Blome: Contessa Treffone. That’s an interesting name. What has been your relationship with such an interesting name throughout your life?
Contessa Treffone: It’s a hard weight to carry… greatness. You give a child a name like that and they have to be something. Ordinariness was never an option. That’s a lot of pressure that people don’t understand. It’s been hard, Toby. Real hard.

After the show’s first season as part of the 2016 NIDA Director and Designer’s Season you were quoted as yelling “you’re all scum” to the cast at the after party. What brought you back to do the show a second time at the Old Fitz?
Three things Toby.
1. Money. All the money.
2. The promise of more fame. If that’s even possible.
3. A dolphin.

Were you at all surprised by what you created during the devising process?
No.

Contessa, if anyone knows anything about you it’s that you love kale! Fave kale recipe?
I like my kale like I like my men. Raw and quiet.

Were you satisfied with my questions today? If not, any constructive feedback?
4/10. I don’t think this audience knows anything about our show and they clearly don’t know enough about me. Fail on both fronts, Toby.

Toby Blome and Contessa Treffone can be seen in There Will Be A Climax by Alexander Berlage.
Dates: 9 Jan – 3 Feb, 2018
Venue: Old Fitz Theatre

5 Questions with David Morton and Nicholas Paine

David Morton

Nicholas Paine: What’s The Wider Earth about?
David Morton: The Wider Earth is a work of fiction drawn loosely from the historical record. It takes memories of real people, places and events and passes them through the lens of myth. Some may call it blasphemous. Others may caution that the simplicity of the tale undermines the real work of its hero. I hope it might stand as a celebration of the incredible complexity of our planet, and go some small way towards humanising the part played by those brave enough to stand against the dominant thought of their time.

What’s it like developing a new work?
Developing new work brings with it the simultaneously liberating and horrifying reality that everything is in flux, and there is nothing to fall back on. It takes a special group of people to inhabit that chaos, particularly with an opening night looming. Over the last couple of years we’ve had the honour of working with an incredible team of creatives and performers. They’ve not only deftly embraced continuous rewrites, the quirks of puppetry, and other obstacles to the process, but had an insatiable drive and passion to push the work to new heights.

Tell me about the design of the puppets.
The design for the puppets used in the show was undertaken during an intensive eight-month process. The journey of each creature began with us spending time with their real-life counterparts, sketching and taking video as studies to determine the key structures and movement qualities of the different animals and how we could best embody these in the final objects. The drawings and notes from these encounters were then turned into three- dimensional digital renderings of each creature to design the mechanisms that would allow for their controlled movements. Finally, these models were broken into cross sections that could be laid at as a plan to be laser cut into wood, paper and leather pieces.

Over the course of four months a team of fabricators assembled these pieces in the Queensland Theatre workshop. This began with slotting and gluing the main structures together to give the creatures a base form that was then further embellished using wicker. The internal mechanisms were activated with the installation of control systems similar to miniature brake cables, and handles and rods were attached. Each of the puppets was given colour using wood stain and arted with ink. Finally, each had a pair of obsidian (volcanic glass) eyes installed.

How were the puppets introduced into the show?
Similarly to the construction, incorporating the finished puppets into the work followed a series of distinct stages. The first of these involved training the ensemble in the key manipulation techniques used by the Society. These include the focus of the puppet, its breath, and its ability to give an illusion of weight and gravity. Following this, the performers were slowly introduced to the various creatures and undertook extensive research into the movement and behavioural qualities of each. When working out the choreography for each scene we first start by devising the large movements – like where on the stage the puppet travels – and as this becomes embodied by the performers more ne detail is added.

The process of bringing a puppet to life on stage takes an incredible degree of commitment and discipline; unlike an actor who spends a rehearsal period developing a character, a puppet has to first learn how to be alive before we can even start to wonder as to what its character might be. Ultimately, the process isn’t completed until the imagination of an audience turns the movement cues that we give into the illusion of life.

If you could take the show anywhere, where would it be?
The Galapagos Islands, of course!

Nicholas Paine

David Morton: Tell us more about the cast for The Wider Earth.
Nicholas Paine: The production features seven of some of the country’s finest actors and puppeteers. Together, they form the ensemble that will tell you the story. The line between actor/puppeteer is blurred. In some scenes you’ll have actors playing characters alongside puppets, and in other scenes those actors will be manipulating puppets and performing more choreographic sequences. It will certainly keep them on their toes… and hopefully you too!

What is it about Charles Darwin that inspired you to create The Wider Earth?
We were inspired to create this work when we were visiting Handspring Puppet Company in South Africa in 2013. We got talking with the Executive Producer, Basil Jones, about how Charles Darwin stopped in Cape Town on the HMS Beagle just prior to returning home to England. We were both familiar with the work of Charles Darwin but what we didn’t realise was that he was just 27 years old when he made this stop and only 22 when he left on the voyage. We thought that his journey could make a stunning coming of age story, full of exquisite creatures, and to make comment on the wonder of our planet.

Dead Puppet Society went to Brooklyn (New York City) for eight months of pre-production in the creation of The Wider Earth. How was that experience for you?
We were developing the show with St. Ann’s Warehouse for that whole period of time. The specific focus of the development program was on refining the kind of puppetry we wanted to use to tell this story. We were working with eight other companies who also work in visual theatre, which for us was a really eye-opening experience. We’ve never really collaborated or connected with any other puppet-based artists before because it’s not an overly used form in Australia. The residency resulted in a 20-minute work in progress showing. And all of those artists have gone on to further develop their work in very different arenas.

How long from page to stage?
It’s about a three-year process. By the time we open it will have been exactly three years.

If you could take the show anywhere, where would it be?
Shrewsbury, UK. Where Charles Darwin was born.

David Morton and Nicholas Paine are producers of Morton’s The Wider Earth, part of Sydney Festival.
Dates: 17 – 27 January, 2018
Venue: Sydney Opera House

5 Questions with Cristabel Sved and Dubs Yunupingu

Cristabel Sved

Dubs Yunupingu: What 5 words would you use to describe the play?
Cristabel Sved: Magical, theatrical, funny, physical, inspirational.

Do you have a favourite moment in the original book and in the play?
There are lots of brilliant moments in Lewis Carrol’s book of course. An important one for me is when Alice challenges the viewpoint and power of the Queen of Hearts. In our play this is where Alice really comes into herself and finds the courage from her adventures and her encounters with all the other wonderful, fantastical characters to stand up to this imposing authority figure.

What has been the most enjoyable part about bringing this play to life?
I’ve enjoyed so much about working on this show. It’s been great working with Mary Anne Butler, the playwright, who has done an amazing job crafting Lewis Carroll’s story for a new audience. And it’s been an absolute pleasure collaborating with our wonderful creative team and these very special young actors to bring the magic of Wonderland to the stage. Revisiting the text and the character of Alice and finding a new relevance and message for young audiences and their families has been a great journey.

What has been the most difficult part about bringing this play to life?
I think the magical things that happen in Wonderland have been our biggest challenge to bring to the stage, but it’s also been lots of fun. Alice shrinks, grows, visits the cosmos, finds herself floating in a river of her own tears, talks to mice and packs of cards…. Our production design is deliberately low tech. It relies on the theatre’s unique ability to transform ordinary objects into extraordinary things. I can’t wait for audiences to come on the journey with us. Of course, we’re asking them to help us create this magic with the powers of their imagination and this is an important theme in our play too.

If you could make any childhood book into a stage show, what would it be?
I might keep that up my sleeve for now!

Dubs Yunupingu

Cristabel Sved: What 5 words would you use to describe Alice In Wonderland?
Dubs Yunupingu: The five words I would use to describe Alice In Wonderland are magical, adventurous, fun, suspenseful and intriguing.

You play Alice. How would you describe her personality?
The way I would describe Alice’s personality is that she is a very strong girl, she is more of a tomboy in a sense that she loves playing footy and loves a good adventure. She doesn’t want to be the neat and pretty girl everyone expects her to be. All she wants to do is find her voice to be able to express herself. Through her journey in Wonderland she slowly builds up the courage to do so.

What is it you are enjoying most about doing this play?
I am enjoying telling the story and bringing Wonderland to life with my amazing work mates.

If Alice could date any current film star who do you think she would choose and why?
If there was no age limit I would say Johnny Depp because of all the amazing crazy adventures he goes on in all the awesome films he has done. He gets to express himself through so many different characters and I feel that all Alice wants to do is to be able to express herself. 

In a nutshell, how have you approached the role of Alice?
I have gone in full force, no expectations and loving every minute of it.   

Cristabel Sved directs Dubs Yunupingu in Alice In Wonderland, part of Sydney Festival.
Dates: 5 – 27 January, 2018
Venue: Riverside Theatres, Parramatta

Sydney Theatre Awards 2017: Nominations

Nominations were announced today for the Sydney Theatre Awards for 2017, which will be presented at a gala ceremony on Monday 22 January 2018 at 6pm at the Everest Theatre, Seymour Centre.

Leading the list with a record 12 nominations is Muriel’s Wedding, produced by the Sydney Theatre Company and Global Creatures, followed by Sydney Theatre Company’s Cloud Nine and Only Heaven Knows from Luckiest Productions and Hayes Theatre Co, both on nine nominations. Calamity Jane, produced by One Eyed Man Productions in association with Neglected Musicals and Hayes Theatre Co, was awarded eight nominations, while both The Trouble With Harry from Siren Theatre Co and Seymour Centre, and Assassins from Hayes Theatre Co received seven nominations. Red Line Productions’ A View From The Bridge received six nominations.

Nominations in the 35 categories were spread across 51 productions which played on Sydney stages during 2017.

BEST MAINSTAGE PRODUCTION
Cloud Nine (Sydney Theatre Company)
Hir (Belvoir)
Mr Burns (Belvoir)
Shit (Sydney Festival)

BEST INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION
Dry Land (Outhouse Theatre Co and Mad March Hare)
The Ham Funeral (Siren Theatre Company)
The Trouble With Harry (Siren Theatre Co in association with Seymour Centre)
A View From the Bridge (Red Line Productions)

BEST DIRECTION OF A MAINSTAGE PRODUCTION
Anne-Louise Sarks (The Merchant of Venice)
Imara Savage (Mr Burns)
Anthea Williams (Hir)
Kip Williams (Cloud Nine)

BEST DIRECTION OF AN INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION
Claudia Barrie (Dry Land)
Kate Gaul (The Ham Funeral)
Kate Gaul (The Trouble With Harry)
Iain Sinclair (A View From the Bridge)

BEST FEMALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE IN A MAINSTAGE PRODUCTION
Genevieve Lemon (Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf)
Heather Mitchell (Cloud Nine)
Kate Mulvany (Richard III)
Helen Thomson (Hir)
Ursula Yovich (Barbara and the Camp Dogs)

BEST MALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE IN A MAINSTAGE PRODUCTION
John Bell (The Father)
Mitchell Butel (The Merchant of Venice)
Darren Gilshenan (Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf)
Pacharo Mzembe (Prize Fighter)
Steve Rodgers (Diving for Pearls)

BEST FEMALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE IN AN INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION
Belinda Giblin (Doubt)
Jodie Le Vesconte (The Trouble With Harry)
Sarah Meacham (Dry Land)
Gabrielle Scawthorn (The Village Bike)

BEST MALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE IN AN INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION
Tommy Bradson (Nosferatutu)
Ivan Donato (A View From the Bridge)
Tobias Manderson-Galvin (Puntila/Matti)
John O’Hare (The Night Alive)

BEST FEMALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MAINSTAGE PRODUCTION
Kate Box (Cloud Nine)
Elaine Crombie (Barbara and the Camp Dogs)
Anita Hegh (The Father)
Claire Lovering (Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf)

BEST MALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MAINSTAGE PRODUCTION
Harry Greenwood (Cloud Nine)
Brandon McClelland (Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf)
Josh McConville (Cloud Nine)
Michael Whalley (Hir)

BEST FEMALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN AN INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION
Antoinette Barboutis (Puntila/Matti)
Charmaine Bingwa (Doubt)
Zoe Terakes (A View From the Bridge)
Janine Watson (A View From the Bridge)

BEST MALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN AN INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION
Justin Stewart Cotta (This Much Is True)
Andrew Lindqvist (Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo)
Lex Marinos (Sunset Strip)
Johnny Nasser (The Ham Funeral)

BEST STAGE DESIGN OF A MAINSTAGE PRODUCTION
Dale Ferguson (Away)
Michael Hankin (Hir)
Marg Horwell (Shit)
Jonathan Oxlade (Mr Burns)

BEST STAGE DESIGN OF AN INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION
Alicia Clements (Assassins)
Isabel Hudson (Dry Land)
Alice Morgan (The Trouble With Harry)
Lauren Peters (Calamity Jane)

BEST COSTUME DESIGN OF A MAINSTAGE PRODUCTION
Elizabeth Gadsby (Cloud Nine)
Michael Hankin (Hir)
Jonathon Oxlade (Mr Burns)
Gabriela Tylesova (Muriel’s Wedding)

BEST COSTUME DESIGN OF AN INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION
Alicia Clements (Assassins)
Alice Morgan (The Trouble With Harry)
Lauren Peters (Calamity Jane)
Emma Vine (Only Heaven Knows)

BEST LIGHTING DESIGN OF A MAINSTAGE PRODUCTION
Paul Jackson (Away)
Chris Petridis (Mr Burns)
Nick Schlieper (Chimerica)
Emma Valente (The Testament of Mary)

BEST LIGHTING DESIGN OF AN INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION
Alexander Berlage (Doubt)
Alexander Berlage (4:48 Psychosis)
Matt Cox (The Trouble With Harry)
Hartley TA Kemp (The Ham Funeral)

BEST SOUND DESIGN OF A MAINSTAGE PRODUCTION
Nate Edmondson (Cloud Nine)
J. David Franzke (Away)
Max Lyandvert (The Testament of Mary)
The Sweats (Chimerica)

BEST SOUND DESIGN OF AN INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION
Nate Edmondson (The Ham Funeral)
Nate Edmondson (Jatinga)
Nate Edmondson (The Trouble With Harry)
Benjamin Freeman (4:48 Psychosis)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE OF A MAINSTAGE PRODUCTION
Chris Williams (Cloud Nine)
The Sweats (Chimerica)
Alana Valentine, Ursula Yovich and Adm Ventura (Barbara and the Camp Dogs)
Kate Miller-Heidke and Keir Nuttall (Muriel’s Wedding)

BEST NEW AUSTRALIAN WORK
Barbara and the Camp Dogs (Ursula Yovich and Alana Valentine)
Black is the New White (Nakkiah Lui)
Muriel’s Wedding (PJ Hogan, Kate Miller-Heidke and Keir Nuttall)
Shit (Patricia Cornelius)

BEST NEWCOMER
Maggie McKenna (Muriel’s Wedding)
Michelle Ny (Dry Land)
Kurt Pimblett (Hir)
Zoe Terakes (A View From the Bridge)
Ebony Vagulans (Diving for Pearls)

BEST PRODUCTION OF A MAINSTREAM MUSICAL
Beautiful (Michael Cassel, Paul Blake, Sony/ATV Music Publishing and Mike Bosner)
Kinky Boots (Michael Cassel by arrangement with Daryl Roth and Hal Luftig)
Ladies in Black (Queensland Theatre, Sydney Festival and Sydney Lyric)
Muriel’s Wedding (Sydney Theatre Company and Global Creatures)

BEST PRODUCTION OF AN INDEPENDENT MUSICAL
Assassins (Hayes Theatre Co)
Calamity Jane (One Eyed Man Productions in association with Neglected Musicals and Hayes Theatre Co)
Only Heaven Knows (Luckiest Productions in association with Hayes Theatre Co)

BEST DIRECTION OF A MUSICAL
Dean Bryant (Assassins)
Richard Carroll (Calamity Jane)
Simon Phillips (Muriel’s Wedding)
Shaun Rennie (Only Heaven Knows)

JUDITH JOHNSON AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE IN A MUSICAL
Annie Aitken (Melba)
Virginia Gay (Calamity Jane)
Esther Hannaford (Beautiful)
Maggie McKenna (Muriel’s Wedding)

JUDITH JOHNSON AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE IN A MUSICAL
David Campbell (Assassins)
Tim Draxl (Only Heaven Knows)
Toby Francis (Kinky Boots)
Ben Hall (Only Heaven Knows)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY A FEMALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MUSICAL
Blazey Best (Only Heaven Knows)
Justine Clarke (Muriel’s Wedding)
Madeleine Jones (Muriel’s Wedding)
Christie Whelan Browne (Muriel’s Wedding)

BEST PERFORMANCE BY A MALE ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MUSICAL
Matthew Backer (Only Heaven Knows)
Rob Johnson (Calamity Jane)
Joe Kosky (High Fidelity)
Hayden Tee (Only Heaven Knows)

BEST CHOREOGRAPHY IN A MUSICAL
Andrew Hallsworth (Assassins)
Andrew Hallsworth (Muriel’s Wedding)
Cameron Mitchell (Big Fish)
Cameron Mitchell (Calamity Jane)

BEST MUSICAL DIRECTION OF A MUSICAL
Daniel Edmonds (Only Heaven Knows)
Isaac Hayward (Muriel’s Wedding)
Nigel Ubrihien (Calamity Jane)
Andrew Worboys (Assassins)

BEST CABARET PRODUCTION
Betty Grumble’s Love and Anger
Blue, the Songs of Joni Mitchell
Hot Brown Honey
Mother’s Ruin: A Cabaret About Gin

BEST PRODUCTION FOR CHILDREN
Diary of a Wombat (Monkey Baa)
Junk (Flying Fruit Fly Circus)
Kaleidoscope (Company 2 and Sydney Festival)
You and Me and the Space Between (Terrapin Puppet Theatre and Sydney Festival)

BEST PRODUCTION FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
Dignity of Risk (atyp/Shopfront Arts)
Moth (atyp)
Oedipus Doesn’t Live Here Anymore (atyp)
When The Streets Had a Name (Monkey Baa)

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
To be announced at the Awards ceremony

Suzy Goes See’s Best Of 2017

Suzy Goes See Best of 2016

After 186 reviews for Suzy Goes See’s 5th year, I still can’t quite wrap my head around the number of shows being staged every evening, all over Sydney. Like this website, many of these theatre productions, attract no significant financial reward to speak of. We do it all for love, and with the understanding that art is a natural, essential part of human existence. We refuse to let money alone decide the things we leave behind, choosing instead to pursue something infinitely more meaningful, and almost always more challenging than we had ever prepared ourselves for. It is an honour to be part of this wonderful landscape, and having the opportunity to help shape it into something better, is truly the most fulfilling vocation. Best Of 2017, a personal selection, and away we go…

Suzy x

 Avant Garde Angels
The bravest and most creative.

 Quirky Questers
The most colourful characters.

♥ Design Doyennes
For sound, lights, sets and costumes.

♥ Musical Marvels
Outstanding performers in musical theatre.

♥ Best Supporting Actors

♥ Best Ensembles

♥ Best Actors (Comedy)

Best Actors (Drama)

♥ Best New Writing

 Best Directors

♥ Shows Of The Year
The mighty Top 10.

 

End

Best of 2016 | Best of 2015Best of 2014Best Of 2013

Review: A Christmas Carol (Lies, Lies And Propaganda)

Venue: Kings Cross Theatre (Kings Cross NSW), Dec 14 – 24, 2017
Playwright: Melissa Lee Speyer (from the Charles Dickens novel)
Director: Michael Dean
Cast: Aslam Abdus-Samad, Dymphna Carew, Bobbie-Jean Henning, Jacqueline Marriott, Monica Sayers, Bishanyia Vincent, Michael Yore
Image by Omnes Photography

Theatre review
The famous Mr. Scrooge is resurrected, in Melissa Lee Speyer’s retelling of A Christmas Carol. The notorious characteristics remain, but his story is updated for our times, with new resonances for the Trump era. This new Scrooge belongs to the tribe that believes in the “trickle-down effect” of conservative politics; the kind of man who tells his employees that they have to work harder, whilst he dreams up new ways to cut their wages. Scrooge’s sin is not that he has an aversion to Christmas, but that he is selfish and unkind. On that one day his workers are away, and he is unable to scheme and torture, ghosts come to haunt him as he faces his own desperate loneliness. On Christmas Day, money proves ineffectual, and he has no recourse but to confront the man in the mirror.

It is a strong adaptation, poignant and accurate with its melancholic observations of contemporary life. Michael Dean’s direction of the piece turns A Christmas Carol into a pantomime for grown-ups, silly in parts, but impressively enthusiastic in the way its message is communicated. Music by Miles Elkington brings a quirky edge, and although not always calibrated to perfection, its function as guide for our emotional responses from scene to scene, is indispensable. The cast is adorable, and very sprightly, with Bobbie-Jean Henning as a captivating, if not entirely convincing, Scrooge. Michael Yore is memorable as the Ghost of Christmas Past, with splendid comic timing and an endearing sense of mischief. Similarly noteworthy is Bishanyia Vincent, especially in the role of Mrs. Cratchit for the production’s most moving sequence, with a contribution surprising in nuance, proving to be remarkably powerful.

When Scrooge is shown the error of his ways, we are reminded of tyrants everywhere who refuse to acknowledge the damage they do, even when presented with incontrovertible evidence. Our cynicism in the age of “fake news” has taught us to expect the worst from men in power, who will deny all their crimes, no matter how plain the truth that is laid out before their eyes. We cannot afford to do nothing and wait for bad men to come to their senses, but their dominance in our world means that we have little at our disposal, in terms of remedy or retribution. It is idealistic, indeed fairytale-like, to wait for the miraculous return of kindness in today’s climate, but on the darkest days, it does seem to be the only thing left. It is perhaps pertinent at Christmas time to remember that Jesus Christ had said, “do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.”

www.liesliesandpropaganda.com

Review: Brothers Karamazov (Arrive. Devise. Repeat)

Venue: PACT Centre for Emerging Artists (Erskineville NSW), Dec 6 – 16, 2017
Playwright: Richard Crane (based on Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s novel)
Director: Viktor Kalka
Cast: Alice Birbara, Ryan Devlin, Patrick Howard, and Lucia May
Image by Clare Hawley

Theatre review
There are only so many conclusions a person can come to, when contemplating the existence of God. In Richard Crane’s adaptation of Dostoyevsky’s Brothers Karamazov, an enormous novel is condensed, leaving only its big philosophical ideas feebly accompanied, by futile episodes of theatre that can only seem reductive in their attempts to make a point.

The depiction of religious struggle in Brothers Karamazov is timeworn, although clearly persistent in its relevance to millions, who continue to structure their lives around all things mystical and illusory. It is an attractive production, with ambitious work across all design faculties from Liam O’Keefe’s lavish lighting to Victor Kalka’s evocative set. Often beautiful and alluringly moody, our senses are kept attentive, even when our minds withdraw from engagement.

Four actors play a range of characters, with unfortunately confusing results. Unable to sufficiently identify the personalities we encounter, the show takes an inordinately long time to establish coherence. Nonetheless, it is a compelling cast, each one full of energetic conviction. Patrick Howard is particularly memorable, with an arresting presence, determined to entertain.

A world in which everything is permissible, is doubtlessly frightening. Self-preservation requires that we invest, in the name of safety and order, in social contracts that we think to be noble, but whether state or religion, the institutions we exalt, never fail to overreach with the powers they are accorded. The same instruments we need for protection, are used invariable to oppress. To keep them constantly monitored is paramount and to have them regularly dismantled and refreshed, is arduous but critical.

www.arrivedeviserepeat.com