Review: Asylum (Brave New Word Theatre Company)

Venue: Comber Street Studios (Paddington NSW), Nov 15 – 25, 2017
Playwright: Ruth Fingret
Director: Richard Hilliar
Cast: Joshua McElroy, Katherine Shearer, David Woodland, Eli Saad, Hannah Raven
Image by David Hooley

Theatre review
Craig is a draconian protector of Australia’s borders, spending his work days assessing the legitimacy of asylum seekers from war torn countries. At home however, he is incapable of caring for those he calls family. Ruth Fingret’s Asylum talks about our national obsession with blaming external factors as the cause of our problems, whilst neglecting obvious and urgent dysfunctions that have nothing to do with the world outside.

It is a simple story, presented in a straightforward manner. Director Richard Hilliar’s refusal of ornamentation in this bare bones staging, creates a clinical atmosphere appropriate for Craig’s coldness, and is indicative of the increasingly brutal approach in how our government operates. Dialogue is dry, often sacrificing nuance for dramatic effect, but strong performances keep the show buoyant.

David Woodland plays Craig as an everyday guy, letting the villainous qualities of his character stay an undercurrent in his portrayal. Joshua McElroy is particularly memorable as Jason, a young offender starved of love, unable to connect without having to resort to drastic measures. Simultaneously intense and vulnerable, the actor’s confidence is unflappable even in the venue’s extremely close quarters.

The Australians we see in Asylum have forgotten kindness. The insecurity of inhabiting a land that was never ceded by rightful owners, makes us paranoid and shameful. Instead of addressing our illicit presence, we channel our disgrace onto those who have a more rightful claim to being here. Guilt is a powerful emotion, that unless managed veraciously, would only exert itself in harmful ways.

www.bnwtheatre.com.au