5 Questions with Caitlin Berry and Jonathan Hickey

Caitlin Berry

Jonathan Hickey: How are you different/similar to your character in Aspects Of Love?
Caitlin Berry: Rose is a wonderfully complicated character and I think, through playing her, I’ve seen some of her qualities rub off on me. Rose has striking confidence and tenacity, which are characteristics that don’t come as naturally to me. I’ve enjoyed inhabiting someone who acts on gut feeling, and I’d like to be as bold as Rose more often! I can relate strongly to her desires as a performer, and also her vulnerability in her professional and personal life.

What is your best/favourite love story of all time?
You can’t go past the smart and stubborn Ms Lizzy Bennet meeting her match, Mr Darcy, in Pride And Prejudice. It didn’t hurt that Colin Firth was added to the imagining of this story in the movie adaptation of the book. The meeting of great minds is very romantic.

Who/when was the first time you fell in love?
I probably felt the full, horrible, wonderful and scary force of love when I was with my high-school sweetheart of three years. We met on a musical (go figure). He was a wonderful man and I did all the stupid things you do when you are in the throes of first love. Many songs and movies suddenly made sense.

Any pre-show rituals or superstitions?
I’m embarrassed to say that I have a few pre-show rituals. They serve as a comfort, but can get in the way of being flexible. I like to arrive quite early, I have certain vocal warm-ups I make sure I do, and I have a butter menthol before I go on stage. I’ve been forced to run around the Hayes building three times because I accidentally said ‘The Scottish Play’– so, I’ve learned my lesson in terms of superstitions.

Where and who will you be spending your Christmas with this year?
My older sister is hosting Christmas for the first time. The baton has changed from my mother. I have nephews and nieces now, so Christmas has become about the little ones and just enjoying precious time together as a large bunch of Berrys. I’ve only missed one Christmas with my family, and I hope I can keep it that way.

Jonathan Hickey

Caitlin Berry: How are you different/similar to your character in Aspects Of Love?
Jonathan Hickey: I see quite a few similarities between myself and Alex – We have both experienced the joy of being in love and also the pain, betrayal and sadness of losing love. When I was younger it was easy to fall in love – now that I’ve experienced heartbreak it stays with you, very much like Rose with Alex. 
 
Who/when was the first time you fell in love?
First time I thought i was in love or said ‘I love you’ was when I was in second year uni. Unfortunately the relationship didn’t last all that long but we’re still friends and keep in touch. But yes I’ve been in love and experienced heartbreak – both of which have helped me in playing Alex. 

Where and who will you be spending your Christmas with this year?
I’m going back to Brisbane for Christmas for a couple of days – my family and I will be spending it with my cousins up in Maleny in the Sunshine Coast hinterland. It’s become a bit of a Christmas tradition to have lunch up there. 
 
Does love change everything?
Love does change everything – to love someone and be loved is beautiful, you become a part of a team – you share your life with that person, support each other. One of my friends told me you’re a “witness of that persons life” which I thought was pretty special. Although it can make you irrational at times, the happiness and well-being of that person you love is more important than your own.

Have you met a famous person, if so who?
When I was in London late last year, I bumped into David Mitchel at Primrose Hill and had a very brief chat – told him I loved his work in Peep Show and various other TV shows and got a quick snap. He was lovely.

Caitlin Berry and Jonathan Hickey can be seen in Aspects Of Love , by Andrew Lloyd Webber.
Dates: 22 Nov – 6 Jan, 2018
Venue: Hayes Theatre

Review: Aspects Of Love (Hayes Theatre)

Venue: Hayes Theatre Co (Potts Point NSW), Nov 22 – Dec 30, 2018
Book: Andrew Lloyd Webber (based on the novella by David Garnett)
Music: Andrew Lloyd Webber
Lyrics: Don Black, Charles Hart
Director: Andrew J. Bevis
Cast: Finn Alexander, Hugh Barrington, Caitlin Berry, Ava Carmont, Annelise Hall, Christopher Hamilton, Jonathan Hickey, David Hooley, Stefanie Jones, Megan Kozak, Wendy Lee Purdy, Michaela Leisk, Matthew Manahan, Sam Marques, Grant Smith
Images by David Hooley

Theatre review
Rose and Alex have an unconventional romance, with each other as constants, but also involving several other people who weave through over the years, to test traditionally held notions of love. David Garnett’s 1955 novella Aspects Of Love is a seductive work, with intentions for a refreshed sense of modernity, but Andrew Lloyd Webber’s clumsy adaptation turns the story into an absurd one, with abrupt renderings that in effect, ridicule its characters and alienate its audience. The opening song “Love Changes Everything”, a legitimate hit from the composer’s heyday, is characteristically schmaltzy, but other tunes are even less appealing, in a show that disappoints from the very beginning.

Although unable to surmount the astonishingly poor writing, this production, directed by Andrew J. Bevis, is assembled with an admirable polish. Tim Chappel’s costumes and Steven Smith’s set design are particularly charming, with John Rayment’s lights helping to provide a visual sophistication to the bewildering goings on. Performers are similarly accomplished, with leading lady Caitlin Berry introducing a high level of professionalism as Rose, to keep us secure in her unwavering and impeccable stage savvy. Alex is played by Jonathan Hickey, convincing as the 17-year-old ingénue, but who gradually loses his grip on the material as the role progresses into maturity. Stefanie Jones is memorable as Giulietta, spirited and alluring in a role that otherwise makes little sense.

At the heart of Aspects Of Love is a wonderful tale that challenges the way we look at our world. Its women are free, able to fall without explanation, time and time again, for friends and lovers all through their lives. They experience marriage, but remain unencumbered. Rose chooses the right husband, who helps her grow beyond the prescribed and parochial, never ceasing to flourish, forever expanding, in both professional and personal terms. The musical however, fails to encapsulate that majesty, instead it deflates and diminishes, with an insistence that all should yield to a perspective that is ultimately pedestrian, and incapable of inspiration.

www.hayestheatre.com.au