5 Questions with Eddie Orton and Tim Walker

Eddie Orton

Tim Walker: The show is a very physical piece of theatre. What has been the most difficult skill you’ve had to learn and which scares you the most?
Eddie Orton: I’ve had some experience with dance and played lots of sport in the past which helped with picking up the skills, especially the acrobatics. The hardest one to learn and master is probably a two high, with you standing on my shoulders. Once you’re up it’s fine, it’s the timing that’s difficult

We’ve worked together in the past, performing Shakespeare in pubs, these are vastly different shows, have you learnt something new about me?
They are certainly super different shows. I’ve learnt that you’re actually a good actor. Haha sorry. I joke. I’ve learnt that you’re an extremely proficient acrobat, both as a flyer and a base. I didn’t know that last year.

When we began rehearsals Shane presented us with over 10,000 pages of research, were there things that surprised you or shocked you?
All of it is shocking to be blunt. You think you have an understanding of Australia’s history but I was very naive. The lack of police action and the sheer volume of cases that are still unsolved is deeply shocking.

We have a couple of school shows throughout this season, why do you think it’s important for young people to learn about this part of Australian history?
It needs to be recognised because I think it’s a part of Australian history that is largely forgotten and ignored. We think we know everything about our history but we don’t. This is not just a problem for the past, it’s a problem for today.

What’s next for Eddie Orton?
Next up is something which I’m not allowed to talk about yet, but I’m very excited about it.

Tim Walker

Eddie Orton: What’s something no one knows about Tim Walker?
Tim Walker: I was once an impromptu stand-in for Neil Gallagher of Oasis. We had similar hair apparently so he and I exchanged shirts and I drove Mischa Barton of The OC around in a 50’s cab while he went to the pub for a feed.

What’s the most difficult part of the show physically for you?
Haha can I say rehearsal? No probably the two high with you. As you say it’s in the timing. I’m excited to do it in front of an audience with even less space to work with haha.

How does movement and physical theatre inform this work?
One of the things that really shocked me in the research was how graphic and horrific the violence was. We felt it was necessary to find a language outside of text that informs this whilst acknowledging the sensitivity of violence for audience members. What we’ve created is a physical language, that abstracts the violence, whilst remaining true to the intention of the verbatim text.

Why do you think it’s important that these stories be heard now?
This show isn’t just about history. It’s also about hope for the future. About how important recognition and acknowledgement are for healing. We know there are thousands of people who have never spoken about their experience with hate crimes and the parliamentary enquiry into these hate crimes has been reopened. The Aids Council of New South Wales are actually still calling for submissions from people affected by hate crimes up until 28th February. We are having an event co-hosted with ACON, post show on Sunday February 23rd and we hope the show will encourage people to make these submissions.

What’s next for Tim Walker?
Well last year I received a small commission to make a few of my own projects. I’ve just finished post production on a short film I wrote and about to start pre on my next one which I’m excited about!

Eddie Orton and Tim Walker can be seen in Our Blood Runs In The Street.
Dates: 19 Feb – 21 Mar, 2020
Venue: Old Fitz Theatre

Review: Our Blood Runs In The Street (Kings Cross Theatre)

Venue: Old Fitzroy Theatre (Woolloomooloo NSW), Feb 19 – Mar 21, 2020
Director: Shane Anthony
Cast: Andrew Fraser, Cassie Hamilton, David Helman, Eddie Orton, Sam Plummer, Ross Walker, Tim Walker
Images by Jasmin Simmons

Theatre review
Violence is an indelible part of LGBTQI history in NSW. In the many years leading up to the decriminalisation of homosexuality and then the legalisation of same-sex marriage, Sydney’s gay men and trans women especially, have suffered physical harm, to the extent of murder, as a result of homophobia and transphobia.

Our Blood Runs In The Street is a work of verbatim theatre, composed of accounts by victims, as well as “family members, witnesses, historians, police officers, journalists and researchers,” presented alongside contemporary dance and physical theatre, for an examination of the prejudice and brutality that has shaped the community.

With stories mainly from the last three decades of the previous century, director Shane Anthony and his team have collated a meaningful text from which we can better understand that past. We are additionally informed that investigations are ongoing, in case new revelations should surface as a result of the show. It is a heavily fragmented work, and although able to convey the severity of incidents, struggles to elicit emotional involvement.

Visually enticing, with imaginative choreography throughout, and lights by Richard Whitehouse bringing constant colour and movement, our eyes are kept entertained. Auditory capacities are attended by composer Damien Lane and sound designer Nate Edmondson, who move us seamless from scene to scene, as they maintain an uncompromising gravity for these harrowing tales.

Seven performers, each one earnest and passionate, deliver testimonials with indisputable conviction. David Helman is particularly impressive with his clever blend of words and movement. Imagery and dialogue in the show do not always work well together, but Helman makes us watch and listen with coherence, without distraction from one or the other. A powerful speech is given by Cassie Hamilton, captivating in her stillness, recounting the serious under-estimation of violence against trans people, as reported by Eloise Brook of The Gender Centre.

The times are slowly changing, but problems for LGBTQI Australians continue, now most notably for ethnic minorities in suburbia. That the stage for Our Blood Runs In The Street is filled with white bodies, is indicative of the disparity that exists between cultures. People of colour have benefited from the work of Western activists, but there remains challenges, specific and nuanced, yet to be addressed. Pride has functioned as an effective war cry for many queers, but it is still a concept that eludes some, for which shame is still the default experience.

www.redlineproductions.com.au