5 Questions with Jasper Lee Lindsay and Nicholas Sinclair

Jasper Lee Lindsay

Nicholas Sinclair: What has been the hardest part of this role?
Jasper Lee Lindsay: I was really worried at first when I thought about the ‘social commentary’ aspect of the play, especially as it’s all very relevant in today’s society and I didn’t want to be the one to take a wrong turn and make people feel sour after the play. But atmosphere of the whole production is filled with such heart and care that I was able to settle in to the play and let go of the worry.

What are the similarities and differences between you and your character?
There are quite a few similarities, but the one I like the most is that we both like to think we’re the wittiest guy in the room, which is funny because Reid actually says his witty things out loud while I just sorta whisper them to myself and pat myself on the back for being so darn clever.

What is the best advice you have been given in regards to acting?
Best advice: “Listen”. I know it’s kind of a boring answer, but it’s how I keep myself happy in performance. Receiving what an actor is giving me in a scene and responding to it in the moment, whilst keeping it all in balance with all the technical work, is great for keeping me active and connected on stage.

What is your dream role?
Every role. *pats self on back*

Why do you think this play is relevant in today’s society?
I think this play is very much about the modern context and how things that used to be considered “taboo” are having more light shone on them today. Nothing is really off-limits to talk about anymore and whether it’s for better or worse, it might just be necessary.

Nicholas Sinclair

Jasper Lee Lindsay: How has it been taking on the role of someone struggling with gender identity?
Nicholas Sinclair: I’m not going to lie, it has been a challenge. As someone who has been lucky enough to have a very easy life in regards to coming out and accepting my sexuality, it was difficult to put myself in the shoes of someone who doesn’t have that same luxury. I feel the hardest part of this character is not making every choice or decision simple or easy to answer.

How does the Post family compare to your real family?
They are completely different! My grandparents aren’t racists and homophobes but like all families we do have our fights just like the Post family. We are really supportive of each other! I think the biggest similarity is that we love Chinese food.

Has playing a teenager brought back any painfully embarrassing memories from your high school days?
Oh god… I guess? I feel I look better in a school uniform now than when I actually went to school. I remember one day when someone put a stink bomb in my bag at lunch time, that was pretty awful. I think my mind may have blocked any embarrassing moments because I’m really struggling to think of some right now.

This play is kind of a roller-coaster of emotions. How do you think the audience will feel at the end of the play?
I hope that they feel the same freedom that we as the characters feel. I want people to walk away with questions and excitement!

What’s your favourite use of the word ‘bitch’?
I think my favourite would have to be: “Whatever, bitch.” Mainly for when someone is trying to prove you wrong and you don’t have time for them anymore… and you also know that you’re wrong.

Jasper Lee Lindsay and Nicholas Sinclair can be seen in Bitch by Wayne Tunks.
Dates: 31 May – 17 June, 2017
Venue: The Depot Theatre