Review: Girl Asleep (Belvoir St Theatre)

belvoirstVenue: Belvoir St Theatre (Surry Hills NSW), Dec 2 – 24, 2016
Playwright: Matthew Whittet
Director: Rosemary Myers
Cast: Ruby Burke, Sheridan Harbridge, Amber McMahon, Martha Morgan, Ellen Steele, Matthew Whittet, Dylan Young
Images by Lisa Tomasetti

Theatre review
Alice and Dorothy are young ladies who travel famously into their subconscious, for memorable stories that have shaped generations. In Matthew Whittet’s Girl Asleep, Greta joins the list, for an exploration into teenage anxiety as it relates to all things social, familial and sexual. Like her predecessors, we meet Greta when she is in a moment of confusion, but our new heroine seems stronger, more independent and wilful, as we watch her battle the demons to emerge with newfound wisdom.

The play is often funny, but its explorations do not go deep enough for us to derive much more than what is presented on the surface. As the show becomes more surreal, we expect harder truths to reveal themselves, but what we get instead are elaborate effects (courtesy of a very impressive team of designers) that fascinate our senses without much intellectual engagement. Music by Luke Smiles and Harry Covill, along with Richard Vabre’s lights and Jonathan Oxlade’s set and costumes, are truly commendable, for the many dimensions they add to what is essentially a static stage.

Ellen Steele brings an admirable dignity to Greta, choosing to portray the girl with grit and pluckiness, without a hint of twee. Her relationships are established with authenticity, most notably her friendship with Elliot, played by the very charming Dylan Young, who brings a valuable quality of joyful innocence to the production. The actor’s irresistible comedy is certainly one of the strongest assets of a show memorable for its sense of humour.

Greta is not quite ready to grow up, but there are forces determined to hurry her into womanhood. Nature has a way of taking us places against our will. Just as we learn to be content with how things are, disruptions inevitably come upon us, and we have to fasten those seat belts again for yet another bumpy ride. Childhood may be a wonderful time, but the promise of better days is always palpable, and in our every breath, we anticipate new gifts from the great unknown.

www.belvoir.com.au